The Spoon Theory

Please take the time to read Christine Miserandino’s personal story and analogy of what it is like to live with sickness or disability. 

The Spoon Theory

by Christine Miserandino www.butyoudontlooksick.com

Spoon girlMy best friend and I were in the diner, talking. As usual, it was very late and we were eating French fries with gravy. Like normal girls our age, we spent a lot of time in the diner while in college, and most of the time we spent talking about boys, music or trivial things, that seemed very important at the time. We never got serious about anything in particular and spent most of our time laughing.

As I went to take some of my medicine with a snack as I usually did, she watched me with an awkward kind of stare, instead of continuing the conversation. She then asked me out of the blue what it felt like to have Lupus and be sick. I was shocked not only because she asked the random question, but also because I assumed she knew all there was to know about Lupus. She came to doctors with me, she saw me walk with a cane, and throw up in the bathroom. She had seen me cry in pain, what else was there to know?

I started to ramble on about pills, and aches and pains, but she kept pursuing, and didn’t seem satisfied with my answers. I was a little surprised as being my roommate in college and friend for years; I thought she already knew the medical definition of Lupus. Then she looked at me with a face every sick person knows well, the face of pure curiosity about something no one healthy can truly understand. She asked what it felt like, not physically, but what it felt like to be me, to be sick.

As I tried to gain my composure, I glanced around the table for help or guidance, or at least stall for time to think. I was trying to find the right words. How do I answer a question I never was able to answer for myself? How do I explain every detail of every day being effected, and give the emotions a sick person goes through with clarity. I could have given up, cracked a joke like I usually do, and changed the subject, but I remember thinking if I don’t try to explain this, how could I ever expect her to understand. If I can’t explain this to my best friend, how could I explain my world to anyone else? I had to at least try.

Read moreThe Spoon Theory

The wisdom of Mom

At the age of 4: Mom knows everything!
At the age of  8: Mom knows a lot.
At the age of 12: Mom doesn’t really know everything.
At the age of 14: Mom doesn’t know anything.
At the age of 16: Mom doesn’t exist.
At the age of 18: She’s old fashioned.
At the age of 25: Maybe Mom does know about this!
At the age of 35: Before we decide, let’s ask Mom.
At the age of 45: I wonder what Mom thinks about this?
At the age of 75: I wish I could ask Mom about this………..

Thanks Bonnie